• Gareth Crook

New Order (2020) - 5/10

I do enjoy a good class struggle plot. Highrise, Snowpiercer, there’s been a few recently that have been inventive with the environment, but have also delivered a fuller narrative than New Order. Here we start at a fancy Mexican wedding. We know right from the get go it’s not going to end well and I don’t mean the matrimony. Marianne (Naian González Norvind) and her fiancée have money, wealthy happy families and a huge house with beautiful grounds in which to hold the big day in the sunshine. From our view it’s too perfect. They know all too well the unrest outside their gated gilded walls and world.

It’s not a simple haves and have nots film though. Some of these rich folks have empathy, well Marianne at least. Together with Christian (Fernando Cuautle) they set out to help a less fortunate friend. It’s here where I thought, yeah I know where this is going. I see the story unfolding like th….. Nope! The first act, is a simple surface scene setter or one half of it. The second act arrives with information about the other half with a cataclysmic bang. What was calm, celebratory and indulgent is fast replaced by chaos. As the two worlds collide in a violent coup. Despite the excellent cinematography and levels of civil unrest at unbelievable levels, it’s really very shocking and come the end of this you’ll be hard pressed to find a group not guilty of something. Marianne is our screen saviour. One of the few we can trust, but she’s a rough ride to navigate the new world she finds herself thrust into. A horrifying one that is often difficult to watch. It’s a hell hole. People who remember civilisation, but have lost it. Just when you think we’ve reached the peak of depravity. Another layer of corruption is revealed. I can’t say it’s entertaining and it’s certainly lacking any hint of satisfaction, but it is good. I felt like I needed a shower after though and I’d be lying if I said I wasn’t a little disappointed. Perhaps an interesting social commentary, but I’m not sure it delivers as a film.

5/10